Posted by on Sep 29, 2015 in Constellation Of the Month | 0 comments

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In the early hours of Monday 28th September, people around the world have observed a rare celestial event, as a lunar eclipse coincided with a so-called “supermoon”.
A supermoon occurs when the Moon is in the closest part of its orbit to Earth, meaning it appears larger in the sky. The eclipse – which made the Moon appear red , was visible for several hours before it misted over. This phenomenon was last observed in 1982 and will not be back before 2033.
In a total lunar eclipse, the Earth, Sun and Moon are almost exactly in line and the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun. As the full Moon moves into our planet’s shadow, it dims dramatically but usually remains visible, lit by sunlight that passes through the Earth’s atmosphere.
Here are some images captured by Society members both in Keighley and in Canada.

Nial 1
From Nial Walls in Canada

linda (2)
An Image taken by Linda Schofield

Nial 1 (2)
From Nial Walls in Canada

linda (3)
An Image taken by Linda Schofield

Nial 1 (3)
From Nial Walls in Canada

linda (4)
An Image taken by Linda Schofield

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An image of the Supermoon prior to the eclipse, taken by Dominic Curran