Keighley Astronomical Society

Discovering the Universe over Yorkshire

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Addingham Gala 2017

Posted by on Jul 17, 2017 in Main |

  PLANETS, stars and aliens all featured in Addingham Gala’s parade on Saturday as children embraced this year’s theme of 2017 A Space Odyssey. Keighley astronomy society were invited to participate. Addingham Pre-School Playgroup pitched Buzz Lightyear and some cute little green aliens again the evil Emperor Zurg to take first prize for...

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Solar observing at Addingham Gala

Posted by on Jul 17, 2017 in Main |

As part of our participation at Addingham gala. We took our two solar scopes to give the public the opportunity to see the Sun safely. At the previous society meeting the guest speaker was Mr Kevin Kilburn, from Manchester astronomical society. He is a keen solar observer, and he suggested that the purchase of two dark pillowcases would greatly help the...

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The July night Sky

Posted by on Jun 27, 2017 in Main |

  As we move into high summer, the sun turns southwards, our nights begin to lengthen and the moonless spell later in the month brings many of us our first dark skies of the summer.   The Plough is in the north west as the Summer Triangle reaches the high meridian. Formed by the bright stars Vega, Altair and Deneb, in the constellations Lyra,...

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Bipolar magnetic regions on the Sun

Posted by on Jun 27, 2017 in Main |

  The centre of our solar system was the object in focus at the June meeting of Keighley Astronomical Society. The guest speaker was Mr Kevin Kilburn from Manchester Astronomical Society. His presentation was ‘The bipolar magnetic regions on the Sun’. A relatively unknown aspect of solar study, which has been identified in the past but forgotten...

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The June night Sky

Posted by on May 29, 2017 in Main |

June brings our summer solstice on the 21st and sees  Jupiter remain as the stand-out object in a night sky that is blighted by persistent twilight at our latitudes. The latter is so severe over northern Britain that it swamps all but the brighter stars and planets. Those bright stars include Vega in Lyra, which is high in the eastern sky, as is the...

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